GrowHackWeb

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Advice from Elon Musk

I’ve become inspired by Elon Musk. I hope he succeeds in all his ventures and implements the recently proposed Hyperloop. I listened to an interview with him where he provided some advice to young entrepreneurs such as myself and so I thought I’d share.

1) Seek out negative advice. Often, you have to Coax negative advice from people because people do not tend to offer up negative advice so as to not offend you.

2) Reason from first principles instead of reasoning by analogy. Meaning, boil things down to fundamental truths and reason up from there.

Battery pack example. Battery packs are really expensive because that’s the way they have been. It’s going to cost 600 per kilowatt-hour. Reason by analogy would have it that it’s not going to be much better than that in the future.

Reasoning from first principles would ask the following: What are the material constituents of a battery? What is the spot market for the material constituents?

First, break them down on a material basis, i.e. material constituents are Cobalt, nickel, aluminum, Carbon, some polymers for separation, steal can. Find out what these cost on the London Stock Exchange, and oh jeez, you find that it costs 80 per hour. 

Now it’s just a matter of assembly.

This must have been a problem from Tesla. Musk is clearly innovating in areas that add value to our society, and the part of Man that I aspire to emulate. So there you have it, advice worth sharing from a noteworthy man.

Filed under entrepreneurship

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Introducing Facebook Exchange

Facebook has made significant progress in making their sidebar ads more valuable with the newly released Facebook Exchange (FBX). Through FBX, advertisers and agencies have been able to use cookie-based targeting through Demand-Side Platforms (DSPs) to reach their audience on Facebook with more timely and relevant goals. Facebook first announced testing of the new ad format in June and the results being reported by Facebook’s ad partners are very positive. AdRoll reported 16x ROI while TellApart noted an avg user click-through rate of 6.65% (compared to 6.41% on Google’s AdX). This is very big news for Facebook since they account for more than 25% of online display ads according to comScore and it’s the first time DSPs are able to extend their retargeting campaigns to Facebook. This can become a large future source of revenue for Facebook.

Filed under marketing monetization facebook

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Facebook Mobile Ads Perform

Facebook is cracking the mobile advertising nut with its Mobile Sponsored Stories. Reported by Techcrunch, mobile sponsored stories by Facebook are getting 1.14% click-through rate at a $0.86 CPC earning Facebook an eCPM of $9.86. Compare that to eCPM of only $0.74 for their combined desktop ad offering.

That is a big deal given the $20B+ mobile advertising market opportunity.

Filed under marketing monetization mobile mobile marketing

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Social Integration

Google has taken its search algorithm to the next level, it’s now become more social. 

By turning on Find My Face, Google+ can prompt people you know to tag your face when it appears in photos.

The time has finally come. This is a clear example of a move toward integration of Search and Social. I searched for images of Bulgaria and was provided with images uploaded by my brother and asked for permission to integrate searched results with google+.

Filed under social search

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Writing Easier Code Using jQuery

Good Lynda blog post on the pros of the jQuery library: 

 It simplifies the process of accessing the DOM (Document Object Model) and supports older browsers. Let’s take a look at a simple example—say that you have an H2 in your page with an ID of ‘cathead’ and you’ve written it out like this.

 <h2 id="cathead">Consumer Widget</h2> 

If you wanted to modify the code to signify a color change when a person clicks on it, you could set up the code like this with JavaScript:

 document.getElementById('cathead').onclick=function () { this.style.color='red'; } 

The first step the JavaScript takes is to search the DOM for an element with an ID of  ’cathead’ and then bind an onclick event to it. It then uses the style property to change the color of the element to red. Pretty basic stuff. To do the same thing in jQuery, you’d write something like this:

 $('#cathead').click(function() { $(this).css("color","red"); }); 

Other than this code being a lot shorter, the first thing that jQuery does is simplify the process of accessing the DOM. If you look at the two different code examples, you’ll see that jQuery uses the $() variable to gain quick access to elements. The great thing about jQuery is that you can use the $() to access any CSS property, not just IDs.

Filed under javascript jquery learning code

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parislemon:

I was a bit surprised when I first saw the screen above on the (great) new Facebook Camera app. That’s the initial screen you get when you first open the app. But how on Earth did the app know my name? I assumed, of course, it was related to the fact that I also had the main Facebook iOS app installed on my iPhone — but still, how did those two apps talk to one another as neither is system-level?
Here’s how. (And here’s Apple’s documentation on it.)
It’s a smart way to do it (though it may get a bit of backlash). And it will allow Facebook to continue to build separate apps for key features — perhaps an Events app next? — that are quick and easy to install and use. Now just imagine if this was baked into iOS itself so other apps could use it (just like the Twitter iOS integration, but actually even a little more seamless). It would save a lot of typing and/or a number of clicks for app switching (Single Sign On). In my mind, this “hack” shows why Facebook eventually needs to do their own mobile OS. Deep integration and seamless use are paramount in mobile.

parislemon:

I was a bit surprised when I first saw the screen above on the (great) new Facebook Camera app. That’s the initial screen you get when you first open the app. But how on Earth did the app know my name? I assumed, of course, it was related to the fact that I also had the main Facebook iOS app installed on my iPhone — but still, how did those two apps talk to one another as neither is system-level?

Here’s how. (And here’s Apple’s documentation on it.)

It’s a smart way to do it (though it may get a bit of backlash). And it will allow Facebook to continue to build separate apps for key features — perhaps an Events app next? — that are quick and easy to install and use. Now just imagine if this was baked into iOS itself so other apps could use it (just like the Twitter iOS integration, but actually even a little more seamless). It would save a lot of typing and/or a number of clicks for app switching (Single Sign On). In my mind, this “hack” shows why Facebook eventually needs to do their own mobile OS. Deep integration and seamless use are paramount in mobile.

Filed under customer activation conversion landing page